Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Climate Change and its Impact

Climate change is clearly already causing enormous human suffering and economic costs, in the here and now. According to the United Nations, adopting sustainable energy would not only help combat these ills of climate change; it would also save millions of lives per year.




Discussions of climate change are often abstract. Yet with a dangerous increase in destructive and a proliferation in large-scale droughts, its adverse effects are becoming more and more profound.
At the World Future Energy Summit 2016 last week, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon spoke about the importance of moving toward sustainable energy sources. Ban stressed that adopting sustainable energy technologies will help combat climate change and prevent the global temperature from exceeding the two degree Celsius goal. An estimated 1 billion people around the world do not have access to electricity. Adopting sustainable energy technologies could help provide access to these people to the resources.

There are two main policy responses to climate- change mitigation and adaptation. Mitigation addresses the root causes, by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while adaptation seeks to lower the risks posed by the consequences of climatic changes. Both approaches will be necessary, because even if emissions are dramatically decreased in the next decade, adaptation will still be needed to deal with the global changes that have already been set in motion.

Adaptation measures may be planned in advance or put in place spontaneously in response to a local pressure. They include large-scale infrastructure changes – such as building defenses to protect against sea-level rise or improving the quality of road surfaces to withstand hotter temperatures – as well behavioral shifts such as individuals using less water, farmers planting different crops and more households and businesses buying flood insurance.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Climate Change Treaty Activities COP 21 Paris

Interlock Media goes on-location for historic treaty negotiations.

Director Jonathan Schwartz, “Fixer” Carla Diamond, and videographer Walter Hergt were in Paris for the dramatic last days of the climate treaty negotiations.  In addition, they captured the grand finale, a massive victory celebration at the foot of the Eiffel Tower.  Reporting on impacts of global warming and human rights since the 1980s it is fitting that Interlock Media was able to participate in this historic occasion.  

The team  took a deep look as well at the alternative activist movements that converged on Paris in December, including direct action militants, non-violent protesters, indigenous leaders, and members of  “Makers” collectives.  The Makers represent some of the best and brightest young entrepreneurs and engineers in Europe and the States. They stoutly believe that the devices that they are making together, such as self-cleansing showers and a dollar a year water filters, can, if developed and shared in an open-source and collective , can reduce poverty and the carbon footprint, especially in the lesser developed world.

They in turn looked at the activities of their national statesmen at COP 21 with appreciation, compassion and yes, a measure of salty disagreement.
While Parisian politicians were garnering world praise for their pivotal role in creating a tangible outcome out of COP 21, local French farmers, environmentalists, and militant back-to-the land occupiers were continuing to fight government attempts to build a second international airport to serve as a gateway West of Paris. 

 The Interlock team joined them as they energetically demonstrated, far removed from the official goings on that made up COP 21.  At the proposed airport  site in Nanders, their fellows were staging a permanent occupation, living in hobbit  style straw bale houses, occupying abandoned homes , even living in tree houses. Today, they were taking their mission to Stalingrad Plaza.


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